Orangetheory

Orangetheory is a new craze in the fitness world that is growing very fast.  There is a lot to be liked about Orangetheory if you have the right mindset and are more of an intrinsically motivated exerciser.  The reason I say that is because these workouts are a full 60 minutes of high intensity cardio and strength training and are not for those looking for a “quick fix”. 

When you look at the official website they explain the basic idea behind Orangetheory as the following:  "The physiological theory behind the Orangetheory workout is known as “Excess Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption,” or EPOC.” (http://www.orangetheoryfitness.com/About-the-Workout/Our-Philosophy).  To sum this idea up, “Excess Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption” (EPOC) has to do with how your body continues to burn calories long after your 60 minute workout is over because of all the energy needed to help your muscles fully recover.  

Orangetheory is not a whole lot different from regular high intensity interval training workouts (HIIT) when looking at the workout itself.  The same basic equipment is used (dumbbells, barbells, treadmills, ellipticals etc.) and the way the workouts are formatted isn’t too different either. The difference is that you wear a heart rate monitor that is hooked up to a TV screen. That makes it so that the fitness instructor can see hard you are actually pushing yourself and that you are at at least 84% of your maximum heart rate the entire time which makes it almost impossible to cheat (people try and cheat?!) when you start feeling tired.   

Overall, I think that Orangetheory is a great workout program and I think that anyone who is willing to put in the work will get the results they are looking for without a doubt.  The only problem is that for a lot Americans, workouts that are this intense will be nothing but a hard and miserable experience which is why I think that Orangetheory should be recommended for those who are already in decent shape and looking to improve their fitness even more.